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Essay/Term paper: Montesquieu

Essay, term paper, research paper:  Humanities

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Montesquieu Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de la

Brede et de Montesquieu was born in 1689 of a noble

family of good standing. His family abandoned

protestantism when Charles was young. Charles like the

children of most noble families at the time received a formal

education. Through his latin studies he developed an

affection for Stoicism. He became imbued with the religious

tolerance of the Stoics. After receiving an education in law

he replaced his uncle as the chief justice in France. He

served this office for ten years when he decided to leave

the profession and seek his love of writing. His first book

was entitled the Persian Letters which he wrote in 1721.

Through this book he showed the " irrationalities and

imperfections of the western world"(1). Montisquieu used

Locke as a mentor whom he called " The great instructor of

mankind." During his travels Montisquieu went to England.

He marveled at the British political scene and the freedom

of political journalism. However he was more interested in

the political institutions rather than the social economic

problems that existed there, thus the lower class is absent

from his writings. He liked the British system of government

for various reasons. " The government of England is wiser,

because there is a body which examines it continuously and

continuously examines itself; its errors never last long, and

are often useful because of the spirit of attention they give

to the people"(1). He also admired the idea of a balanced

constitution of which the doctrine of separation of powers

has become politically the most influencial expression. "

There can be no liberty where the executive, legislative, and

judicial branches are under one person or body of persons

because the result is arbitrary despotism(tyranny)"(1).

Montisquieu believes that the only way for a government to

be run fairly is by having a system that doesn"t allow one

person to control all of the power. Montisquieu says that

forms of government are complex combinations of physical

and environmental factors on one hand and psychological

motivations-ways of life-on the other. Montisquieu openly

disagrees with Hobbes by saying that men are in nature at

peace rather than at war because the state of war comes

from the formation of society not from human nature.

Montisquieu believes that basic human nature is good. He

says that men form societies to ensure themselves with

security and protection. Living alone man is at peace

because he views himself as being weak. However when

man joins society he finds strength in numbers which leads

to the innate desire to war and conquer. Derived from the

nature of the state Montisquieu states three types of

government. First is the Republican form. He says that this

should be used in a small state with temperate weather

conditions. This form of government has democratic

powers, using representation to elect government officials.

The second form is the Monarchial form. This is for a

medium sized state. This form has a king that rules by rules

that have already been established by the people or kings

before him. The third type is the Despotic form. This is for

a large sized state with a hot climate. In this form there is a

tyrant who rules through fear without rules or regulations.

Montisquieu is interested in the spirit of the laws, rather

than the law itself. He says that once mankind sets up

society and government, there are three kinds of law. The

first is the law of nations, which applies to their mutual

intercourse ie international law. The second is political law.

This applies to the relations between government and the

governed. This is constitutional, public, and administrative

law. The third type is civil law. Civil law regulates the

relations of citizens among themselves. These laws are

created from reason. "Montisquieu shared with the

eighteenth-century French philosophers, rational,

cosmopolitan humanists their optimism and faith in human

progress through reason"(1). Montisquieu states that law in

general is the human reason. Montisuqieu maintains that

society is directed by laws and liberty comes when people

follow the laws. Even in a moderate government liberty is

hard to find because man abuses power. That is why he

thinks that power should be checked with equal power. "

One can not produce laws by following mere fancy and

imagination because laws in their most general signification

are the necessary relations arising from the nature of

things"(1). Montisquieu outlines his program of combining

rationalism (which emphasizes the universal) with the

historical method (which emphasizes the uniquely

individual) by describing law as relating to the amount of

people in a state and the climatic conditions, and cultures of

that state. In general Montisquieu believes that human

nature is generally good. The most perfect laws are created

and maintained through their spirit rather than the laws

themselves. He believes that a balanced constitution with a

separation of powers is the most ideal form of government.

He also believes that other forms of government are

pertenant to society as long as they are used in the context

of that society. Finally he believes that the only way to have

liberty is by having laws and having people in that society

that are willing to obey those laws. Montesquieu

Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de la Brede et de

Montesquieu was born in 1689 of a noble family of good

standing. His family abandoned protestantism when Charles

was young. Charles like the children of most noble families

at the time received a formal education. Through his latin

studies he developed an affection for Stoicism. He became

imbued with the religious tolerance of the Stoics. After

receiving an education in law he replaced his uncle as the

chief justice in France. He served this office for ten years

when he decided to leave the profession and seek his love

of writing. His first book was entitled the Persian Letters

which he wrote in 1721. Through this book he showed the

" irrationalities and imperfections of the western world"(1).

Montisquieu used Locke as a mentor whom he called " The

great instructor of mankind." During his travels Montisquieu

went to England. He marveled at the British political scene

and the freedom of political journalism. However he was

more interested in the political institutions rather than the

social economic problems that existed there, thus the lower

class is absent from his writings. He liked the British system

of government for various reasons. " The government of

England is wiser, because there is a body which examines it

continuously and continuously examines itself; its errors

never last long, and are often useful because of the spirit of

attention they give to the people"(1). He also admired the

idea of a balanced constitution of which the doctrine of

separation of powers has become politically the most

influencial expression. " There can be no liberty where the

executive, legislative, and judicial branches are under one

person or body of persons because the result is arbitrary

despotism(tyranny)"(1). Montisquieu believes that the only

way for a government to be run fairly is by having a system

that doesn"t allow one person to control all of the power.

Montisquieu says that forms of government are complex

combinations of physical and environmental factors on one

hand and psychological motivations-ways of life-on the

other. Montisquieu openly disagrees with Hobbes by

saying that men are in nature at peace rather than at war

because the state of war comes from the formation of

society not from human nature. Montisquieu believes that

basic human nature is good. He says that men form

societies to ensure themselves with security and protection.

Living alone man is at peace because he views himself as

being weak. However when man joins society he finds

strength in numbers which leads to the innate desire to war

and conquer. Derived from the nature of the state

Montisquieu states three types of government. First is the

Republican form. He says that this should be used in a

small state with temperate weather conditions. This form of

government has democratic powers, using representation to

elect government officials. The second form is the

Monarchial form. This is for a medium sized state. This

form has a king that rules by rules that have already been

established by the people or kings before him. The third

type is the Despotic form. This is for a large sized state with

a hot climate. In this form there is a tyrant who rules

through fear without rules or regulations. Montisquieu is

interested in the spirit of the laws, rather than the law itself.

He says that once mankind sets up society and

government, there are three kinds of law. The first is the

law of nations, which applies to their mutual intercourse ie

international law. The second is political law. This applies

to the relations between government and the governed.

This is constitutional, public, and administrative law. The

third type is civil law. Civil law regulates the relations of

citizens among themselves. These laws are created from

reason. "Montisquieu shared with the eighteenth-century

French philosophers, rational, cosmopolitan humanists their

optimism and faith in human progress through reason"(1).

Montisquieu states that law in general is the human reason.

Montisuqieu maintains that society is directed by laws and

liberty comes when people follow the laws. Even in a

moderate government liberty is hard to find because man

abuses power. That is why he thinks that power should be

checked with equal power. " One can not produce laws by

following mere fancy and imagination because laws in their

most general signification are the necessary relations arising

from the nature of things"(1). Montisquieu outlines his

program of combining rationalism (which emphasizes the

universal) with the historical method (which emphasizes the

uniquely individual) by describing law as relating to the

amount of people in a state and the climatic conditions, and

cultures of that state. In general Montisquieu believes that

human nature is generally good. The most perfect laws are

created and maintained through their spirit rather than the

laws themselves. He believes that a balanced constitution

with a separation of powers is the most ideal form of

government. He also believes that other forms of

government are pertenant to society as long as they are

used in the context of that society. Finally he believes that

the only way to have liberty is by having laws and having

people in that society that are willing to obey those laws.

Montesquieu Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de la

Brede et de Montesquieu was born in 1689 of a noble

family of good standing. His family abandoned

protestantism when Charles was young. Charles like the

children of most noble families at the time received a formal

education. Through his latin studies he developed an

affection for Stoicism. He became imbued with the religious

tolerance of the Stoics. After receiving an education in law

he replaced his uncle as the chief justice in France. He

served this office for ten years when he decided to leave

the profession and seek his love of writing. His first book

was entitled the Persian Letters which he wrote in 1721.

Through this book he showed the " irrationalities and

imperfections of the western world"(1). Montisquieu used

Locke as a mentor whom he called " The great instructor of

mankind." During his travels Montisquieu went to England.

He marveled at the British political scene and the freedom

of political journalism. However he was more interested in

the political institutions rather than the social economic

problems that existed there, thus the lower class is absent

from his writings. He liked the British system of government

for various reasons. " The government of England is wiser,

because there is a body which examines it continuously and

continuously examines itself; its errors never last long, and

are often useful because of the spirit of attention they give

to the people"(1). He also admired the idea of a balanced

constitution of which the doctrine of separation of powers

has become politically the most influencial expression. "

There can be no liberty where the executive, legislative, and

judicial branches are under one person or body of persons

because the result is arbitrary despotism(tyranny)"(1).

Montisquieu believes that the only way for a government to

be run fairly is by having a system that doesn"t allow one

person to control all of the power. Montisquieu says that

forms of government are complex combinations of physical

and environmental factors on one hand and psychological

motivations-ways of life-on the other. Montisquieu openly

disagrees with Hobbes by saying that men are in nature at

peace rather than at war because the state of war comes

from the formation of society not from human nature.

Montisquieu believes that basic human nature is good. He

says that men form societies to ensure themselves with

security and protection. Living alone man is at peace

because he views himself as being weak. However when

man joins society he finds strength in numbers which leads

to the innate desire to war and conquer. Derived from the

nature of the state Montisquieu states three types of

government. First is the Republican form. He says that this

should be used in a small state with temperate weather

conditions. This form of government has democratic

powers, using representation to elect government officials.

The second form is the Monarchial form. This is for a

medium sized state. This form has a king that rules by rules

that have already been established by the people or kings

before him. The third type is the Despotic form. This is for

a large sized state with a hot climate. In this form there is a

tyrant who rules through fear without rules or regulations.

Montisquieu is interested in the spirit of the laws, rather

than the law itself. He says that once mankind sets up

society and government, there are three kinds of law. The

first is the law of nations, which applies to their mutual

intercourse ie international law. The second is political law.

This applies to the relations between government and the

governed. This is constitutional, public, and administrative

law. The third type is civil law. Civil law regulates the

relations of citizens among themselves. These laws are

created from reason. "Montisquieu shared with the

eighteenth-century French philosophers, rational,

cosmopolitan humanists their optimism and faith in human

progress through reason"(1). Montisquieu states that law in

general is the human reason. Montisuqieu maintains that

society is directed by laws and liberty comes when people

follow the laws. Even in a moderate government liberty is

hard to find because man abuses power. That is why he

thinks that power should be checked with equal power. "

One can not produce laws by following mere fancy and

imagination because laws in their most general signification

are the necessary relations arising from the nature of

things"(1). Montisquieu outlines his program of combining

rationalism (which emphasizes the universal) with the

historical method (which emphasizes the uniquely

individual) by describing law as relating to the amount of

people in a state and the climatic conditions, and cultures of

that state. In general Montisquieu believes that human

nature is generally good. The most perfect laws are created

and maintained through their spirit rather than the laws

themselves. He believes that a balanced constitution with a

separation of powers is the most ideal form of government.

He also believes that other forms of government are

pertenant to society as long as they are used in the context

of that society. Finally he believes that the only way to have

liberty is by having laws and having people in that society

that are willing to obey those laws. Montesquieu

Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de la Brede et de

Montesquieu was born in 1689 of a noble family of good

standing. His family abandoned protestantism when Charles

was young. Charles like the children of most noble families

at the time received a formal education. Through his latin

studies he developed an affection for Stoicism. He became

imbued with the religious tolerance of the Stoics. After

receiving an education in law he replaced his uncle as the

chief justice in France. He served this office for ten years

when he decided to leave the profession and seek his love

of writing. His first book was entitled the Persian Letters

which he wrote in 1721. Through this book he showed the

" irrationalities and imperfections of the western world"(1).

Montisquieu used Locke as a mentor whom he called " The

great instructor of mankind." During his travels Montisquieu

went to England. He marveled at the British political scene

and the freedom of political journalism. However he was

more interested in the political institutions rather than the

social economic problems that existed there, thus the lower

class is absent from his writings. He liked the British system

of government for various reasons. " The government of

England is wiser, because there is a body which examines it

continuously and continuously examines itself; its errors

never last long, and are often useful because of the spirit of

attention they give to the people"(1). He also admired the

idea of a balanced constitution of which the doctrine of

separation of powers has become politically the most

influencial expression. " There can be no liberty where the

executive, legislative, and judicial branches are under one

person or body of persons because the result is arbitrary

despotism(tyranny)"(1). Montisquieu believes that the only

way for a government to be run fairly is by having a system

that doesn"t allow one person to control all of the power.

Montisquieu says that forms of government are complex

combinations of physical and environmental factors on one

hand and psychological motivations-ways of life-on the

other. Montisquieu openly disagrees with Hobbes by

saying that men are in nature at peace rather than at war

because the state of war comes from the formation of

society not from human nature. Montisquieu believes that

basic human nature is good. He says that men form

societies to ensure themselves with security and protection.

Living alone man is at peace because he views himself as

being weak. However when man joins society he finds

strength in numbers which leads to the innate desire to war

and conquer. Derived from the nature of the state

Montisquieu states three types of government. First is the

Republican form. He says that this should be used in a

small state with temperate weather conditions. This form of

government has democratic powers, using representation to

elect government officials. The second form is the

Monarchial form. This is for a medium sized state. This

form has a king that rules by rules that have already been

established by the people or kings before him. The third

type is the Despotic form. This is for a large sized state with

a hot climate. In this form there is a tyrant who rules

through fear without rules or regulations. Montisquieu is

interested in the spirit of the laws, rather than the law itself.

He says that once mankind sets up society and

government, there are three kinds of law. The first is the

law of nations, which applies to their mutual intercourse ie

international law. The second is political law. This applies

to the relations between government and the governed.

This is constitutional, public, and administrative law. The

third type is civil law. Civil law regulates the relations of

citizens among themselves. These laws are created from

reason. "Montisquieu shared with the eighteenth-century

French philosophers, rational, cosmopolitan humanists their

optimism and faith in human progress through reason"(1).

Montisquieu states that law in general is the human reason.

Montisuqieu maintains that society is directed by laws and

liberty comes when people follow the laws. Even in a

moderate government liberty is hard to find because man

abuses power. That is why he thinks that power should be

checked with equal power. " One can not produce laws by

following mere fancy and imagination because laws in their

most general signification are the necessary relations arising

from the nature of things"(1). Montisquieu outlines his

program of combining rationalism (which emphasizes the

universal) with the historical method (which emphasizes the

uniquely individual) by describing law as relating to the

amount of people in a state and the climatic conditions, and

cultures of that state. In general Montisquieu believes that

human nature is generally good. The most perfect laws are

created and maintained through their spirit rather than the

laws themselves. He believes that a balanced constitution

with a separation of powers is the most ideal form of

government. He also believes that other forms of

government are pertenant to society as long as they are

used in the context of that society. Finally he believes that

the only way to have liberty is by having laws and having

people in that society that are willing to obey those laws.

Montesquieu Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de la

Brede et de Montesquieu was born in 1689 of a noble

family of good standing. His family abandoned

protestantism when Charles was young. Charles like the

children of most noble families at the time received a formal

education. Through his latin studies he developed an

affection for Stoicism. He became imbued with the religious

tolerance of the Stoics. After receiving an education in law

he replaced his uncle as the chief justice in France. He

served this office for ten years when he decided to leave

the profession and seek his love of writing. His first book

was entitled the Persian Letters which he wrote in 1721.

Through this book he showed the " irrationalities and

imperfections of the western world"(1). Montisquieu used

Locke as a mentor whom he called " The great instructor of

mankind." During his travels Montisquieu went to England.

He marveled at the British political scene and the freedom

of political journalism. However he was more interested in

the political institutions rather than the social economic

problems that existed there, thus the lower class is absent

from his writings. He liked the British system of government

for various reasons. " The government of England is wiser,

because there is a body which examines it continuously and

continuously examines itself; its errors never last long, and

are often useful because of the spirit of attention they give

to the people"(1). He also admired the idea of a balanced

constitution of which the doctrine of separation of powers

has become politically the most influencial expression. "

There can be no liberty where the executive, legislative, and

judicial branches are under one person or body of persons

because the result is arbitrary despotism(tyranny)"(1).

Montisquieu believes that the only way for a government to

be run fairly is by having a system that doesn"t allow one

person to control all of the power. Montisquieu says that

forms of government are complex combinations of physical

and environmental factors on one hand and psychological

motivations-ways of life-on the other. Montisquieu openly

disagrees with Hobbes by saying that men are in nature at

peace rather than at war because the state of war comes

from the formation of society not from human nature.

Montisquieu believes that basic human nature is good. He

says that men form societies to ensure themselves with

security and protection. Living alone man is at peace

because he views himself as being weak. However when

man joins society he finds strength in numbers which leads

to the innate desire to war and conquer. Derived from the

nature of the state Montisquieu states three types of

government. First is the Republican form. He says that this

should be used in a small state with temperate weather

conditions. This form of government has democratic

powers, using representation to elect government officials.

The second form is the Monarchial form. This is for a

medium sized state. This form has a king that rules by rules

that have already been established by the people or kings

before him. The third type is the Despotic form. This is for

a large sized state with a hot climate. In this form there is a

tyrant who rules through fear without rules or regulations.

Montisquieu is interested in the spirit of the laws, rather

than the law itself. He says that once mankind sets up

society and government, there are three kinds of law. The

first is the law of nations, which applies to their mutual

intercourse ie international law. The second is political law.

This applies to the relations between government and the

governed. This is constitutional, public, and administrative

law. The third type is civil law. Civil law regulates the

relations of citizens among themselves. These laws are

created from reason. "Montisquieu shared with the

eighteenth-century French philosophers, rational,

cosmopolitan humanists their optimism and faith in human

progress through reason"(1). Montisquieu states that law in

general is the human reason. Montisuqieu maintains that

society is directed by laws and liberty comes when people

follow the laws. Even in a moderate government liberty is

hard to find because man abuses power. That is why he

thinks that power should be checked with equal power. "

One can not produce laws by following mere fancy and

imagination because laws in their most general signification

are the necessary relations arising from the nature of

things"(1). Montisquieu outlines his program of combining

rationalism (which emphasizes the universal) with the

historical method (which emphasizes the uniquely

individual) by describing law as relating to the amount of

people in a state and the climatic conditions, and cultures of

that state. In general Montisquieu believes that human

nature is generally good. The most perfect laws are created

and maintained through their spirit rather than the laws

themselves. He believes that a balanced constitution with a

separation of powers is the most ideal form of government.

He also believes that other forms of government are

pertenant to society as long as they are used in the context

of that society. Finally he believes that the only way to have

liberty is by having laws and having people in that society

that are willing to obey those laws. Montesquieu

Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de la Brede et de

Montesquieu was born in 1689 of a noble family of good

standing. His family abandoned protestantism when Charles

was young. Charles like the children of most noble families

at the time received a formal education. Through his latin

studies he developed an affection for Stoicism. He became

imbued with the religious tolerance of the Stoics. After

receiving an education in law he replaced his uncle as the

chief justice in France. He served this office for ten years

when he decided to leave the profession and seek his love

of writing. His first book was entitled the Persian Letters

which he wrote in 1721. Through this book he showed the

" irrationalities and imperfections of the western world"(1).

Montisquieu used Locke as a mentor whom he called " The

great instructor of mankind." During his travels Montisquieu

went to England. He marveled at the British political scene

and the freedom of political journalism. However he was

more interested in the political institutions rather than the

social economic problems that existed there, thus the lower

class is absent from his writings. He liked the British system

of government for various reasons. " The government of

England is wiser, because there is a body which examines it

continuously and continuously examines itself; its errors

never last long, and are often useful because of the spirit of

attention they give to the people"(1). He also admired the

idea of a balanced constitution of which the doctrine of

separation of powers has become politically the most

influencial expression. " There can be no liberty where the

executive, legislative, and judicial branches are under one

person or body of persons because the result is arbitrary

despotism(tyranny)"(1). Montisquieu believes that the only

way for a government to be run fairly is by having a system

that doesn"t allow one person to control all of the power.

Montisquieu says that forms of government are complex

combinations of physical and environmental factors on one

hand and psychological motivations-ways of life-on the

other. Montisquieu openly disagrees with Hobbes by

saying that men are in nature at peace rather than at war

because the state of war comes from the formation of

society not from human nature. Montisquieu believes that

basic human nature is good. He says that men form

societies to ensure themselves with security and protection.

Living alone man is at peace because he views himself as

being weak. However when man joins society he finds

strength in numbers which leads to the innate desire to war

and conquer. Derived from the nature of the state

Montisquieu states three types of government. First is the

Republican form. He says that this should be used in a

small state with temperate weather conditions. This form of

government has democratic powers, using representatio 

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